2005 Followers
22 Following
helliepie

Helen O'Reilly's Spunky Blog

Reading, for me, leads to writing, as day leads into night and night back into day; they are halves of a whole. I was one of those kids who cracked the code early; I've been reading since I was three, and the writing came later once I'd learned to hold a pencil, but when it came, it really burst forth. Everything a working writer does I have done-- I have written and published everything, from corporate annual reports, to radio ads, children's poetry, -fiction and -non-fiction, to memoir and now, my first novel for adults. Spunk, a Fable is a lot like me; "just dirty enough."

Selling Spunk (No, I'm Not Talking about Opening a Sperm Bank)

Reblogged from Helen O'Reilly's Spunky Blog:

Any author who self-publishes may dream of being "plucked from obscurity" and elevated to fame and riches upon the mere publication of his or her book, but most of those who do will be sorely disappointed. (Fame and wealth may come to a few lucky writers, but I read somewhere that even a New York Times bestselling author only earns about $50,000 a year from his or her writing.)

 

For books to sell at all, never mind in the quantities that would make a bestseller, today it is necessary for authors, even those who are traditionally published, to learn to market their books.

 

I will be sharing some of the strategies that seem to be working for me, or that have at least produced some positive results. They are in no particular order, because that's the way I did them. (Thanks to Lone Morch over at She Writes Press for getting me thinking about this.)

 

Getting Media Coverage

 

Reporters are busy, with many competing demands for their attention. That's why your pitch (which is basically what a Press Release is) has to grab and hold their attention long enough for them to feel that your good idea is worth pitching on their own, to their editor. 

 

Learn something about the criteria for newsworthiness, which, like everything else these days, you can find on Google. Basically, they are:

 

Six Criteria for Newsworthiness

 

  • Prominencea person,organization or institution in the story is important or well-known.

 

  • Proximitynearby; newspapers print stories about people and events in the community or region where their readers live.

 

  • Timelinesssomething happening orimportant right now; most news stories reflect events in the immediate past or involving an issue that affects readers now.

 

  • Oddity/uniquenessout of the ordinary, unusual; some stories are about people or events that are unexpected or special in some way.

 

  • Consequenceeffects of a decision or event; newspapers publishstories aboutissues that affect readers directly or indirectly.

 

  • Human interestsomething that touches lives, imagination or emotions of readers; stories may be about an inspiring teacher or a courageous pet, for instance.

 

Read on for an example of how I hooked a reporter with humor, then try to see how many examples of newsworthiness I squeezed into the following press release:

 

Make 'Em Laugh

 

 

Area Woman, 60, “Not Dead Yet,” Pens Novel, Spunk, a Fable;

Book Rebuts Feminist's Claim Men Are Doomed

 

 

June 26, 2013

 

Las Vegas, NV— When it hit bookshelves in the fall of 2012, journalist Hanna Rosin’s The End of Men: And the Rise of Women (Riverhead, 2012) provoked debate about her premise that men are obsolete, and that women are becoming the dominant sex. “It certainly got me thinking,” says Las Vegas author Helen O’Reilly. Thinking and writing; O’Reilly’s resulting novel, Spunk, a Fable, just released (Createspace, 2013), and it’s available in paperback and kindle versions from Amazon.com.

 

“As a heterosexual woman who has married two of them, buried one of them, and given birth to three of them—men, that is—the idea of a world without men irked me. Of course that’s not literally what Rosin’s book is about. But after all, technology has now made it possible to start with a cell, replace its DNA, and cut papa out of the picture. I began to think about the kind of world that would create, and Spunk, a Fable was the result. Eventually.”

 

Having published myriad titles the traditional way, for Scholastic, Inc. and others, O’Reilly was well aware of the perilous health of the modern publishing industry. “I spent about twenty minutes feeling like a victim: ‘Oh, publishing dies just as I finish my first novel.’ Then I decided to take advantage of what was killing traditional publishing—self-publishing—and became my own publisher.

 

Living and writing in Las Vegas, NV, O’Reilly works as a book editor for a specialized small press. Her previous titles include The Secret of Willow Ridge, and The Soul Workout, for Central Recovery Press, and A Poem a Day, for Scholastic.

 

“I think I’m a typical Baby Boomer; we keep thinking of new things we want to try, and don’t see any reason why we shouldn’t. I’m also a classic Las Vegan. This is the land of re-invention. I’ve entered my third act now, as a novelist. I've become what I always wanted to be when I grew up.”

 

Contact: Helen O’Reilly

email: helenhavlin@hotmail.com

website:

(702) 465-5759

(702) 493-7781

(702) 476-1993

 

 

http://helenhavlin.wix.com/spunky